Author societies help gigging bands break through

The creative sector is what we’re good at in Europe – something that could really help us grow in the future, economically and culturally.’

The above quotation by European Commissioner Neelie Kroes is something that we as author societies whole-heartedly believe in. And helping the European cultural sector grow is something we are committed to.

Sometimes, there’s misunderstanding about the role of author societies – often we talk uniquely about our primary function of administering author rights. Now, that’s an important job, but it’s far from all we do.

Author societies work hard to promote and encourage talent where they are based, promoting cultural diversity as we go.  Take PRS for Music , the UK-based author society, for example. Music Makeover 2012 demonstrates PRS for Music’s commitment to live music and shows how this society is successfully adapting to changes in the UK’s cultural landscape.

 

Live Music Act 2012

This October, the Live Music Act 2012 will take effect. What this means is that small venues in England and Wales will no longer need local authority permission to host live music performances.

 

Promoting culture

In practice, the new law liberates small pubs and clubs – for the first time, a great many will be free to put on shows that entertain local communities, giving budding stars a chance to shine and disseminating cultural talent. And that’s crucial: after all, European culture starts with local culture.

 

Economic benefits

The new law also promises vast economic benefits. Did you know that a pub that puts on a live music show on Fridays and Saturdays can earn close to £700 more each day? In today’s tough economic climate, that’s an important financial plus.

 

Music Makeover 2012

PRS for Music  designed the Music Makeover 2012 competition to maximize the potential of the new law. The lucky winner – to be announced at the end of this year – will win £5000 to spend kitting out their venue to make sure it’s up to scratch for hosting live bands.

Last year’s winner, David Pott from the Market inn in Faversham, was delighted with the prize money – and what it meant for his business:

“We were extremely pleased to win – pleased for us and the pub. The prize money will be a great boost for the pub and the community. This will put Market Inn on the map for music.”

So the Music Makeover brings tangible benefits to the British pub scene. And it sends a clear sign across Europe that author societies are committed to the cultural and economic well-being of creators everywhere.

 

 

 

The creative sector is what we’re good at in Europe – something that could really help us grow in the future, economically and culturally.’

The above quotation by European Commissioner Neelie Kroes is something that we as author societies whole-heartedly believe in. And helping the European cultural sector grow is something we are committed to.

Sometimes, there’s misunderstanding about the role of author societies – often we talk uniquely about our primary function of administering author rights. Now, that’s an important job, but it’s far from all we do.

Author societies work hard to promote and encourage talent where they are based, promoting cultural diversity as we go.  Take PRS for Music , the UK-based author society, for example. Music Makeover 2012 demonstrates PRS for Music’s commitment to live music and shows how this society is successfully adapting to changes in the UK’s cultural landscape.

 

Live Music Act 2012

This October, the Live Music Act 2012 will take effect. What this means is that small venues in England and Wales will no longer need local authority permission to host live music performances.

 

Promoting culture

In practice, the new law liberates small pubs and clubs – for the first time, a great many will be free to put on shows that entertain local communities, giving budding stars a chance to shine and disseminating cultural talent. And that’s crucial: after all, European culture starts with local culture.

 

Economic benefits

The new law also promises vast economic benefits. Did you know that a pub that puts on a live music show on Fridays and Saturdays can earn close to £700 more each day? In today’s tough economic climate, that’s an important financial plus.

 

Music Makeover 2012

PRS for Music  designed the Music Makeover 2012 competition to maximize the potential of the new law. The lucky winner – to be announced at the end of this year – will win £5000 to spend kitting out their venue to make sure it’s up to scratch for hosting live bands.

Last year’s winner, David Pott from the Market inn in Faversham, was delighted with the prize money – and what it meant for his business:

“We were extremely pleased to win – pleased for us and the pub. The prize money will be a great boost for the pub and the community. This will put Market Inn on the map for music.”

So the Music Makeover brings tangible benefits to the British pub scene. And it sends a clear sign across Europe that author societies are committed to the cultural and economic well-being of creators everywhere.

 

Published on 07 September 2012